speaker-info

Joe Dugan

Gallagher Evelius & Jones LLP

Joe is a commercial litigation attorney in Baltimore, Maryland, whose practice involves partnership and contract disputes, intellectual property disputes, and employment litigation. Joe has a particular interest (and recent experience) in cases involving the intersection between discovery procedures/practices and emerging technologies, including pandemic-era communication tools.

Prior to joining Gallagher Evelius & Jones in Baltimore, Joe clerked for The Honorable James K. Bredar, now Chief Judge of the U.S. District Court for the District of Maryland, and for The Honorable David F. Hamilton of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. Joe also served as a trial attorney with the Federal Programs Branch of the U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Division, where he defended federal agencies and officials in cases that presented novel claims under the U.S. Constitution, the Administrative Procedure Act, and other federal statutes.

Joe graduated summa cum laude from Indiana University Maurer School of Law in 2015. While in law school, Joe served as Executive Editor of the Indiana Law Journal and was a tournament champion in the school-wide Sherman Minton Moot Court Competition.

My Sessions

Document Retention, Litigation Holds, and E-Discovery Best Practices with Emerging Communication Technologies

During the COVID-19 pandemic, many organizations adopted collaboration tools such as Zoom, Microsoft Teams, Slack, and Google Drive, among others. These tools made hybrid and remote work possible and are a central feature of intra-office communication. Employees are generating more written content than ever before, but organizations may overlook the litigation risk or the practical […]

Litigation Tech
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Evidentiary Use of the Temporal Web

A key question for trial lawyers is when web content appeared online. Gaps in organizational recordkeeping, turnover in digital systems, and reliance on cloud services make historical web content particularly susceptible to loss. Web archives such as the Internet Archive Wayback Machine (IAWM) as well as other available free tools make it possible for litigators […]

Litigation Tech
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